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MathWriting


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You will be assigned lessons here to think about and write about math.

Olympic Graphs: Medals

Which countries win the most medals?  

Exploration:
Take a look at the New York Times Olympic Medal map.  Play the slideshow of the graph by clicking on the green arrow.  Watch the names of the countries. What do you notice about the countries? about the names of the countries? Why might the names of the countries change? 

Look at the medal winners from year to year. What happens when you place your mouse cursor over a country?  What can do you learn from this?  Did you learn anything else about which countries participated? the names of the countries?

What did you learn from the slideshow and the year-by-year study of the graph?

What kinds of things can you learn from this graph?

Investigation: -- To think and record:

Partner/Group/Individual
Take a look at the medal map created by the  New York Times. You can click the green arrow to watch the circles grow, shrink, appear, and disappear based on which countries participated and the numbers of medals won.  Using math terms, write five statements that you know are true based on this map. After each statement, explain how you know the statement is true. Indicate your name(s) on your paper. Finally, explain how how this graph helped you understand about the Olympic medal winners.

The link:      http://2010games.nytimes.com/medals/map.html
For credit, include:
  • Five statements using math terms (numbers, vocabulary, labels) that are true.
  • After each statement, write a statement on how you know it is true
  • An explanation for how this graph helped you think about the Olympic medal winners.
  • Edit your statements for grammatical correctness and flow of thought.
  • Your code name(s)
  • Be prepared to share using your statements and the map.
Add your responses to the blog here:   http://writemath4u.blogspot.com/2010/02/olympic-medals-which-countries-win.html


Evaluating Polls

Under construction

What are polls? How are they conducted? Are they valid and reliable?  How do you know? What information will you learn from polls?

1. Take a poll; compare class results to poll results.



Answer  poll questions here.

Do you think these results are representative of your entire grade? Of the entire school? Of people in your age group? Why or why not?


Look at New York Times results here.

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