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Brain


Intelligence and the Brain
  
 W8 Share     W7Share     W6Share


Final Essay
Evaluate these two theories. Include at least six details from the research on the brain in your evaluation.

Yes. I think the brain is like a muscle and the more you exercise it, the stronger it gets.

No. You are born with being however smart or dumb you are and that's the way it is.



Introduction
Choose one statement below that you agree with: Write a response that includes ABC (A-Answer the question; B-Back it up with evidence; C- Connect or Comment):

Yes. I think the brain is like a muscle and the more you exercise it, the stronger it gets.

No. You are born with being however smart or dumb you are and that's the way it is.


Speed Debate:




Readings:


Part 1 Strategy: Key Words and Summarize  PDF Click here.
Read the article with a partner, taking turns reading paragraphs. Decide which twelve words while you are reading are the most important to explain the main idea. Highlight. Write a gist statement to summarize the main idea of this page. Be prepared to share.

Part 2 Strategy: Key Words, Summarize, Question PDF Click here.
Read the article with a partner, taking turns reading paragraphs. Decide which twelve words while you are reading are the most important to explain the main idea. Highlight. Write a gist statement to summarize the main idea of this page. 

Ask a question: What does the article wonder about? Write a question you have about the first two parts of The Brain article.

Be prepared to share.

Part 3  Strategy: Key Words, Summarize, Question, Visualize PDF Click here.
Read the article with a partner, taking turns reading paragraphs. Decide which twelve words while you are reading are the most important to explain the main idea. Highlight. Write a gist statement to summarize the main idea of this page. 

Ask a question: What does the article wonder about? Write a question you have about The Brain article.

Draw the images you see in your mind as you read. Describe your image in one sentence.

Be prepared to share.

Part 4  Strategy: Key Words, Summarize, Question, Visualize, Evaluate  PDF Click here.
Read the article with a partner, taking turns reading paragraphs. Decide which twelve words while you are reading are the most important to explain the main idea. Highlight. Write a gist statement to summarize the main idea of this page. 

Draw the images you see in your mind as you read article four.  Describe your image in one sentence.

Ask a question: What does the article wonder about? Write a question you have about The Brain article.


Evaluate the application of the information in the article:

Answer: What insight can be drawn from all four articles? (EALR 2.4.1)

Think: Of what value is the information in the article?-- How useful is the information to others?

Answer: Who might benefit from the information in all four articles? (use four details from the article) (EALR 2.4.1)

 (Use a detailed ABC response.)

Be prepared to share.



Position Evaluation

Write a detailed ABC Response  to:

Do you believe that intelligence is fixed or can grow?  Why? 
Use at least four details from the text.

Be prepared to share.

Share/Revise for Speed Debate 2


 Category     1 2 3 4
 Answer Yes/No Yes/No with sentence Yes/No
with complete and accurate sentence
 Yes/No with complete and accurate sentence with voice
 Back It Up Include one relevant detail Included two-three relevant details Included four relevant details and quotes Included four relevant details and quotes with explanations 
or more details
 Comment
or connect 
 Includes (relevant)
one comment or connection  that relates the ideas back to the text.
 Includes (relevant) two of these: comment
or
connections
or two comments or two connections that relate back to the text
 Includes (relevant) a comment or connection back to the text
with each of four details and quote
 Includes (relevant) a comment or connection back to the text with each details  and quote that engages the reader or explains the writers application of the detail/quote
 Writing Writes in lists or phrases; few complete sentences; includes convention errors Writes in paragraph that is somewhat organized with complete sentences that provide evidence to support position; includes position; may include a transition; may include some persuasive words; includes evidence to support position; may include conclusion Writes in paragraph what includes:
  • introductory position
  • main idea sentences followed by interesting details/evidence sentences that support the position
  • transition words to connect evidence  (cause/effect; point by point; least to most important)
  • persuasive words
  • conclusion that expects reader to understand AND do something
 All of three, and including word choice -- author musts
to establish a strong voice
Presentation Reads  Reads with eye contact and some expression Uses paper as a reference (not just reads), makes eye contact with audience; presents with expression; may answer relevant audience questions Uses paper as a reference (not just reads), makes eye contact with audience; presents with expression; answers relevant questions of audience; asks relevant questions to audience--engages conversation


Speed Debate 2

Teach Others

Brain Broster or Comic with BitStrips (use broster requirements)
Your broster may be Google Slides (preferred)

Prewrite:

Remember -- Literal and Figurative Language

Literal: the facts, the statements-- I'm hungry.
Figurative: poetic, comparative, insightful, inferential-- I'm so hungry I could eat a horse.

Create ideas for broster on another paper.
 This is your brain learning This is your brain not learning
  


Sample Broster -- What's missing? Use checklist to evaluate.
Sample Broster





Review and Reflect

What was the most important thing your learned from the brain lesson? Was it interesting? If yes, why? If not, why not?



Goals (EALRS)

Reading 2.1.3

Apply comprehension monitoring strategies during and after reading: determine importance using theme, main ideas, and supporting details in grade-level informational/expository text and/or literary/narrative text. W

  • State both literal and/or inferred main ideas and provide supporting text-based details.
  • State the theme/message and supporting details in culturally relevant literary/narrative text.
  • Organize theme, main idea and supporting details into a self-created graphic organizer to enhance text comprehension.
Reading 2.4.1 
Analyze literary/narrative text and information/expository text to draw conclusions and develop insights. W
  • Draw conclusions from grade-level text (e.g., the most important idea the author is trying to make in the story/poem/ selection, what inspiration might be drawn from the story/poem/selection, who might benefit from reading the story/poem/selection).
Writing 3.1.2 Develops ideas and organizes writing

Analyzes and selects an effective organizational structure.

  • Writes unified, cohesive paragraphs (e.g., supporting examples in order of importance, paragraph topic connected by transitions).
  • Composes an engaging introduction (e.g., meaningful rhetorical question, interesting facts, relevant anecdote).
  • Composes an ending/conclusion that is more than a repetition of the introduction (e.g., a reconnection to reader, a call for action, a statement of significance).
  • Uses transitions to show relationships among ideas (e.g., if ... then, cause/ effect, either ... or, meanwhile).
  • Uses effective organizational patterns as determined by purpose:
    • ~ explanations (e.g., cause and effect)
    • ~ comparisons (e.g., point-by-point, similarities and then differences)
    • ~ persuasion (e.g., least to most important arguments)

Lesson Adapted from: 

Speed Debate from: TES Essay Writing Toolkit


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